Walking

Untitled bronze sculpture, group of figures by Bert Flugelman, 1964, UNSW Sydney, Australia. Taken while traversing the University campus. 

In a previous post I wrote about my dilemma of finding the best way to travel to work on public transport. I think I have the answer. 

The M10 from Leichhardt runs around every ten minutes in the morning. The journey time is between 45 minutes and one hour, depending on traffic. This trip pays a dividend in the form of exercise time. Ten minutes walking from home to bus stop on the flat followed by ten minutes through campus, mostly uphill. 

According to The Conversation I need to walk at a moderate pace for at least 30 minutes for five days per week. The remaining 10 minutes can be achieved on the trip home by either alighting two stops early or catching buses whose routes don’t pass the end of our road. 

Any walking I do during the day is a bonus!

Blue Line

Blue Line, 1919

Georgia O’Keeffe (1887 – 1984) America. 

Oil on canvas. 

Part of an exhibition of modernist artists with Margaret Preston and Grace Cossington Smith at the Art Gallery of New South Wales. 

Stained glass

KADER ATTIA, Untitled, 2014, 116 stained glass fragments, metal screw hooks, and fluorescent fixtures. 

Museum of Contemporary Art, Australia

The above is installed in a temporary wall. When entering the one-man show one approaches the back (or is it the front) of the piece. There is a rough, torn out hole in the wall, pieces of plasterboard lie scattered and heaped on the floor. The structure of the wall and the lighting behind the stained glass can be viewed through the hole. 

This installation reminded me of a disused church in Worcester, England that had lain empty for a while. Pieces of bottle green and purple coloured glass from the windows, lay on the earth surrounding the building. It was eventually converted into expensive apartments. 

Jewel in the Harbour

These days I usually take pictures with an iPhone 6. The results are good enough for the finger swipe world we live in. The evening I took the above was a special occasion. We had just finished celebrating our friend’s 50th birthday over dinner in the Dining Room, Park Hyatt Sydney. Nestled near the south pylon of the Harbour Bridge, this hotel has one of the best views of the Sydney Opera House. 

Thankfully I took the trouble of fishing out my Sony Nex-5N digital SLR camera, ensuring the battery was charged. The clear Winter’s evening and water on top of a wall yielded the jewel of Sydney Harbour and it’s reflection. I used Snapseed app for iPad to sharpen and enhance the structure of the image. 

“Tut”outrageous behaviour

One day I was waiting for the bus, in a world of my own. Slowly a few other people added to the number, haphazardly positioned around the stop. 

When the bus arrived I moved in line with the doors. Noticing a few passengers inside the bus who were making their way to the front, presumably to alight, I took one step back. As I did so a person rushed in front of me to get onboard. I would normally not react to this sort of occurrence. On this occasion I declared, “you’re supposed to wait until people have got off!”
Months, and many trips have passed since this experience. This morning while reenacting the scene, I was reminded of it. This was immediately followed by questions: who made the rule? And, even though I prefer not to queue, was I outraged that someone jumped in front of me?
The answer to the former and the latter is, while I can’t remember being formally trained in the niceties of polite travel on public transport, it is an ingrained, British thing to give way to others. 

Dove Tail

Matthys Gerber, Dove Tail 2013, synthetic polymer paint on wall. 

I was wowed by this work on a recent visit to the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, Australia. 

Winter sails

Albert Park Lake, Melbourne. This scene was more comfortable from inside the restaurant. I was lucky that a few weak rays of Winter sunshine illuminated the sails at just the right moment. 

I used Snapseed for iPad app to accentuate the dark water and bring out the malevolent blue sky. 

Winter warmth

The trees in Sydney are catching on to the fact that it is Winter. 

Winter warmth of russet, orange, 

Red, and some brown ‘gainst sky of blue;

Sluggish words rolling off the tongue; 

Round sounds linger in the crisp air.