Cleveland, we will return

Looking towards Ormiston from Raby Boulevard Park, Cleveland

We are slowly working our way through an unwritten list of places to visit in Brisbane and its surrounds. Having a couple of hours to spare before a late Sunday lunch we headed 23 km east south-east to Cleveland and Raby Bay. A teeny Celsius temperature and gloomy skies, threatening rain were a reminder that Winter had started.

With a population of around 15k, Cleveland is the centre of Redland City, Queensland; end of the line for the train and the start of a ferry journey to North Stradbroke Island.

Stan was happy to explore the trees and grass of Raby Boulevard Park while we watched the antics of the brave on groyne protected beaches.

We will return on another day, when the sun is shining.

South Brisbane Railway Station

South Brisbane Railway Station was constructed in 1891, opening on 21 December. 

In 1930, South Brisbane also became the site of the South Brisbane Interstate Station, as it was the terminus of the standard gauge railway line from Sydney to Brisbane.

OPTO, 2011

This steel and carbon fibre sculpture (2011) by New Zealander artist, Phil Price is located on the Redcliffe, Queensland foreshore.

Further information about the sculpture and artist is taken from Visit Moreton Bay webpage:

“The concept around OPTO revolves around looking and changing. Looking promotes a sense of place – we can look out over the bay, from the land to the sea, and we can look back to the land, from the sea. Looking can also be interpreted as a metaphor – we can look into the future or back into the past. The form of the sculpture represents a portal – we look through it to a framed landscape, observing the natural and man-made world via the circular scope.

Designed to act as a metaphorical portal, the kinetic rings move in direct relationship to the environment, rotating and spinning in response to the breeze from Moreton Bay. Passing over one another, they appear to open and close, changing the framed landscape within the circular form.

OPTO serves as a celebration of this beautiful place: past, present and future.

About the Artist

Phil Price is best known for his kinetic sculptures with many located across New Zealand and Australia. Regarded as the foremost kinetic sculptor of his generation, Phil’s work is widely acknowledged for its breathtaking beauty and extraordinary design.

The main materials used in most of the sculptures are carbon fiber and glass fiber bonded with high temperature epoxy, stainless steel and precision bearings to allow the sculpture to move with the wind.”

Aerial roots

This magnificent Moreton Bay fig tree stands proudly in Mowbray Park, East Brisbane.

Images of faeries and forest spirits hiding deep within the densely packed aerial roots flood my mind.

A testament to the resilience of nature; seemingly oblivious to nearby park and ride commuters taking the ferry north, long term road works on Lytton Road, and construction work in the Park.

Manly, Queensland

Manly Harbour from Norfolk Point causeway

My husband let me know that the house was making him feel claustrophobic. I agreed with him, having only accomplished one ‘explore Queensland’ outing in the car since moving to Brisbane last year. We settled on making an 11km journey east, to Manly.

Don’t get me wrong, we like living in a modern house with a private courtyard. What we find challenging is that there is no view, other than looking at the walls of the neighbouring property. Also, most of the outside area is covered by a roof. Great for shade, not so great for creating a feeling of openness.

We have accomplished a lot in the last three months as noted in my previous post, Avoidance. This has taken its toll. Believing that we should be constantly busy at home winds one up so.

Masts, Manly Harbour from Sea Vibes kitchen and bar

After a short spell at Norfolk Point, we completely relaxed while sitting outside Sea Vibes kitchen and bar. Lightly gazing at the masts in the Harbour and feeling a breeze that took the heat out of a 30oC day.

Birdsong

Before our trip to Europe we were awoken each morning by a rousing chorus of crows. A month on, jet lag has us awaking around 4:30 am and falling asleep a little after 8:00 pm.

Thankfully the nearby birdsong has changed to tweets and flute like birdsong that is much more pleasing to the ear.

The other afternoon, I found it satisfying to hear a kookaburra calling.

Smell it in the air

As with most parts of the World, the Australian east coast is experiencing freaky weather. Forecasts of Brisbane receiving monster electric storms followed by a deluge of biblical proportions have so far not eventuated.

Official sources report that since the beginning of October temperatures have varied from 12.5oC at night to 27.5oC at their peak. On Wednesday afternoon our car recorded 33oC when we left the hardware store in Cannon Hill.

Fortunately there are major supermarkets located about ten minutes’ walk to the right of our home and smaller specialist stores to the left.

Yesterday, I ventured out to the shops a few times. While walking along the street I noticed that the air felt silky against my skin and I could smell the heat of Summer in the air. The local fragrance is one of slightly damp earth warmed by the Sun combined with the faint scent of bark, leaves and some flowering trees.